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In addition to his film work, Williams was Music Director of the Boston Pops Orchestra for 13 highly successful seasons and is currently Laureate Conductor of that famed ensemble. As a guest conductor, he appears regularly with many of the world’s most renowned orchestras. His composition work reaches beyond the screen, as he has also written many concert pieces, including two symphonies and concertos for flute, tuba, violin, clarinet, bassoon, cello and trumpet. GEORGE LUCAS (Writer, Director, Executive Producer) is the creator of the phenomenally successful Star Wars saga and Indiana Jones series and the Chairman of the Board of Lucasfilm Ltd., LucasArts Entertainment Company LLC, Lucas Digital Ltd. LLC., Lucas Licensing Ltd. and Lucas Learning Ltd. Lucas directed his first feature film, THX 1138, in 1970. The film was produced by American Zoetrope and executive-produced by Francis Coppola. In 1971, Lucas formed his own film company, Lucasfilm Ltd., in San Rafael, California. In 1973, Lucas co-wrote and directed American Graffiti. The film won a Golden Globe, the New York Film Critics’ and National Society of Film Critics’ awards, and garnered five Academy Award nominations. Four years later, Lucas wrote and directed Star Wars – a film which broke all box office records and earned seven Academy Awards. Lucas went on to co-write the screenplays for The Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi, which he also executive produced. In 1980, he co-wrote the story and was the executive producer of Raiders of the Lost Ark, directed by Steven Spielberg, which won five Academy Awards. He was also the co-executive producer and creator of the story for Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom. The film, released in 1984, earned two Academy Award nominations and won an Oscar for its visual effects. In 1986, Lucas served as executive producer for Disneyland’s 3-D musical space adventure Captain Eo, which was directed by Francis Coppola and starred Michael Jackson. Lucas was also involved in the creation of Star Tours, a popular attraction at each of the Disney Theme Parks. Lucas’ next project was the adventure-fantasy film Willow. Based on an original story by Lucas, the film was directed by Ron Howard and executive-produced by Lucas. Willow was released in 1988 and received three Academy Award nominations. Also in 1988, Lucas executive-produced Tucker: The Man and His Dream. The film, directed by Francis Coppola, garnered three Academy Award nominations. In the following year, Lucas wrote the story and served as executive producer for Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade. The film was nominated for two Academy Awards, earned an Oscar for Best Sound Design, and became the number one worldwide box office hit for 1989. Lucas served as story author and executive producer of the television series The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles, which premiered in 1992. The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles won a Banff Award for Best Continuing Series, a Golden Globe nomination for best Dramatic Series, an Angel Award for Quality Programming, 12 Emmy Awards and 26 Emmy nominations. In 1992, George Lucas was honored with the Irving G. Thalberg Award. The Award was given by the Board of Governors of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences for achievement in producing. Lucas was the story author and executive producer of Radioland Murders in 1994. To celebrate the twentieth anniversary of Star Wars in 1997, Lucas updated each film of the Trilogy to bring it closer to his original vision. The Star Wars Trilogy Special Edition was released theatrically worldwide with digitally remastered soundtracks, restored prints, enhanced visual effects and newly added footage. Lucasfilm, established by George Lucas in 1971, has today evolved into five Lucas companies. The Lucas group of companies includes Lucasfilm Ltd., Lucas Online, LucasArts Entertainment Company LLC, Lucas Digital Ltd. LLC, Lucas Licensing Ltd. and Lucas Learning Ltd. Lucasfilm includes all of Lucas’ feature film and television productions as well as the business activities of the THX Group, which is dedicated to ensuring excellent film presentation quality in theaters and homes through a series of specialized services. LucasArts is a leading international developer and publisher of interactive entertainment software, which have won critical acclaim with more than 100 industry awards for excellence. Lucas Digital, which consists of Industrial Light & Magic (ILM) and Skywalker Sound, provides visual effects and audio post-production services to the entertainment and commercial production industries. ILM employees have won 40 Oscars working on films which have been awarded 14 Academy Awards for Best Visual Effects and received 14 Scientific and Technical Achievement Awards. Skywalker Sound employees have been honored with 28 Oscars working on films which have been awarded 15 Academy Awards for Best Sound and Best Sound Effects Editing. Lucas Licensing is responsible for the merchandising of all of Lucasfilm’s film and television properties. Lucas Learning strives to create an "uncommon learning" experience by offering engaging interactive software products that provide learning opportunities through exploration and discovery. George Lucas is the Chairman of the Board of the George Lucas Educational Foundation. He currently serves on the boards of the Artists Rights Foundation, the Joseph Campbell Foundation, and the Film Foundation. In addition, he is a member of the USC School of Cinema-Television Board of Councilors. It was BEN BURTT ’s (Sound Designer) sound design work – creating the voice of R2-D2, the hum and crash of lightsabers in battle, and the zooming rush of the speeder bike chase – that gave the original Star Wars trilogy its convincing feel of audio reality. Twenty years later, Burtt worked for over six months on the Star Wars Trilogy Special Edition, re-mixing and re-editing sound effects, music and dialog from the original track. Born in Syracuse, New York, Burtt earned a college degree in Physics. In 1970, he won the National Student Film Festival with a war movie called Yankee Squadron. For his work on the special effects film Genesis he won a scholarship to USC, where he earned a Master’s Degree in Film Production. Burtt has been in the film business for over 23 years as a sound designer, mixer, editor, writer and director. Some of Burtt’s interests include "my kids, the history of film, mountain biking, skiing, and reading history, astronomy, and science." In Burtt’s 15 years as a sound designer for Lucasfilm, he won Academy Awards for Sound and Sound Effects Editing in four films: Star Wars, E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial, Raiders of the Lost Ark and Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade. Burtt also did sound design for Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, The Empire Strikes Back, Return of the Jedi, Always, Willow, Alien, More American Graffiti, Howard the Duck, The Dark Crystal, Nutcracker, The Motion Picture, The Dream is Alive, Alamo and Niagara. In 1990, Burtt became independent and started working as a director. He directed Second Unit for 20 episodes of The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles, also serving as picture editor for four episodes of Young Indy, and occasionally, sound designer. Burtt directed and co-wrote the Young Indy movie "Attack of the Hawkmen." He directed the IMAX film Blue Planet and directed and co-wrote the IMAX film Special Effects. Burtt was also a writer on the Lucasfilm Droids animated television series, including the one-hour ABC Droids special entitled "The Great Heep."
STAR WARS: EPISODE I THE PHANTOM MENACE GARY RYDSTROM (Director of Creative Operations/Sound Designer and Mixer, Skywalker Sound) joined Skywalker Sound in 1983 as an operator in the machine room. Since then, he has contributed his talents to many projects as a sound designer, re-recording mixer, effects mixer and foley mixer. In 1998, Rydstrom was appointed Director of Creative Operations for Skywalker Sound, overseeing the creative and technological direction for the facility. Apart from his feature film and commercials work, Rydstrom has completed several television projects, rides and attraction films. Rydstrom holds a graduate degree from the USC School of Cinema and Television. He is the recipient of 7 Academy Awards for Best Sound and Best Sound Effects Editing for his work on Saving Private Ryan, Titanic, Jurassic Park, and Terminator 2: Judgement Day. NICK DUDMAN (Creatures Effects) is a veteran of several Lucasfilm productions including Return of the Jedi, Willow and Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade. In fact, he got his start in films, working on Yoda, as a trainee to British make-up artist Stuart Freeborn on The Empire Strikes Back. After apprenticing with Freeborn for four years on films such as Superman II and Top Secret!, Dudman was asked to head up the English make-up laboratory for Ridley Scott’s Legend. Since then, he has worked on Mona Lisa, High Spirits, Interview With the Vampire, Batman and Judge Dredd. In 1995, he was asked to oversee the 55-man creature department for the Luc Besson film The Fifth Element. The ever innovative Dudman has marketed a new prosthetic material called Dermplast that is used to create remarkable aging effects in make-up. The substance is for sale exclusively through Dudman’s own company, the whimsically named "Pigs Might Fly." DENNIS MUREN (Visual Effects Supervisor) is the Senior Visual Effects Supervisor at Industrial Light & Magic. Recipient of eight Academy Awards for Best Achievement in Visual Effects, Muren is actively involved in the evolution of the company, as well as the design and development of new techniques and equipment. Among his many credits as a visual effects supervisor are The Lost World: Jurassic Park, Casper, Jurassic Park, Terminator 2: Judgment Day, The Abyss, Innerspace, Young Sherlock Holmes, Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, Return of the Jedi and E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial. As a pioneer in the use of computer and digital technology for film, SCOTT SQUIRES (Visual Effects Supervisor) combines technical expertise with a highly creative touch. Squires has developed a number of breakthrough techniques including the "Cloud Tank Effect" used in Close Encounters of the Third Kind. In 1979, Squires co-founded Dream Quest Images and was a visual effects supervisor, as well as the company’s president, for six years. His Dream Quest projects included Blue Thunder, The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai Across the Eighth Dimension, Deal of the Century, One From the Heart and Blade Runner. Squires joined Industrial Light & Magic in 1985. In 1994, Squires received a Scientific and Engineering Award from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences for his pioneering work in the area of film input scanning. He received an Oscar nomination for best achievement in visual effects for The Mask and received his second nomination for Dragonheart. JOHN KNOLL (Visual Effects Supervisor) brings a special expertise and innovativeness in computer graphics to the creation of visual effects. Knoll and his brother are the authors of Photoshop, a high-end image processing program for Macintosh computers. Similar to a Quantel Paintbox, Photoshop allows users extensive creative control over the enhancement and editing of images. Knoll was also the Computer Graphics Project Designer on The Abyss, for which ILM was honored with its 10th Academy Award for Best Visual Effects. His additional credits as a visual effects supervisor include Star Trek: First Contact, Star Wars Special Edition, Mission: Impossible and Star Trek Generations. ROB COLEMAN (Animation Supervisor) joined ILM’s team of animators in 1993 to work on The Mask. Coleman’s other motion picture credits include Men in Black, Dragonheart, The Indian in the Cupboard, In the Mouth of Madness and Star Trek Generations. Prior to joining ILM, he began his career working on Captain Power, the first television series to combine computer animated characters to live action. The project won a Gemini Award (the Canadian equivalent of an Emmy) for best technical achievement. Coleman has since produced computer animation and graphics for broadcast and commercials, worked on a special cell animated film for the World Health Organization, formed his own small studio for commercial and television projects, and produced a series of special on-air graphics, openings and station identifications. TM & © 2011 Lucasfilm Ltd. All rights reserved. ™ and © Twentieth Century Fox 2012.
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Having gained his first theatrical experience at the Perth Repertory Theatre, EWAN McGREGOR (Obi-Wan Kenobi ) trained at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama. He left Guildhall in March 1992 to play the leading role in Dennis Potter’s Lipstick on Your Collar, a six-part serial drama for Channel 4, before traveling to Morocco in October 1992 to film Bill Forsyth’s feature Being Human. He went on to star in Penny Cineiwicz’s production of Joe Orton’s What the Butler Saw at the Salisbury Playhouse early in 1993. He played the lead role in Ben Bolt’s three-part BBC TV adaptation of Stendahl’s classic 19th Century novel, Scarlet and Black, and was in Family Style, a short film from a Lloyds Bank Challenge-winning script, directed by Justin Chadwick for Channel 4. Other television credits include Kavanagh QC, Doggin’ Around, "Cold War," an episode of Tales from the Crypt, and a guest part in an episode of ER. McGregor starred in Shallow Grave, a feature film produced by Andrew MacDonald and directed by Danny Boyle for Figment Films. Shallow Grave was named Best Film at the 1994 Dinard Film Festival. McGregor shared the Best Actor award with co-stars Christopher Eccleston and Kerry Fox, and it won the BAFTA Alexander Korda Award for The Outstanding British Film of the Year and the BAFTA Scotland Award for Best Feature Film. McGregor’s additional film credits include Blue Juice, The Pillow Book, Trainspotting and A Life Less Ordinary, again for Danny Boyle and Andrew MacDonald; Emma, Brassed Off, Nightwatch, The Serpent’s Kiss, Velvet Goldmine and Little Voice. McGregor recently starred on stage in Little Malcolm and His Struggle Against the Eunuchs at the Comedy Theatre, and directed his first short film, Bone. NATALIE PORTMAN (Queen Amidala) has established herself as one of Hollywood’s most talented and sought-after young actresses. Portman recently starred with Susan Sarandon in Wayne Wang’s upcoming Anywhere But Here for Fox 2000 Pictures. Adapted from Mona Simpson’s novel by Academy Award-winner Alvin Sargent (Ordinary People), Anywhere But Here tells the story of a mother and daughter who must come to terms with their volatile relationship in the midst of a move from the Midwest to Beverly Hills. Last year, Portman completed her Broadway debut run in the title role of The Diary of Anne Frank. Directed by James Lapine and adapted by Wendy Kesselman, the production took a fresh look at the play, incorporating new material from The 1995 Definitive Edition of Anne Frank’s diaries. Portman received international acclaim for her feature debut in Luc Besson’s The Professional. Starring opposite Jean Reno and Gary Oldman, Portman played Mathilda, a young girl who seeks refuge from a hitman after her parents are killed by a corrupt DEA officer. Her performance was hailed by critics and she received a "Best Actress in a Drama" for The Hollywood Reporter-sponsored YoungStar Awards. Portman received critical acclaim for her scene-stealing performance in the Miramax film Beautiful Girls. Directed by Ted Demme, the bittersweet comedy also starred Timothy Hutton, Uma Thurman, Rosie O’Donnell, and Matt Dillon. Other feature credits include Woody Allen’s musical Everyone Says I Love You, co-starring Julia Roberts, Goldie Hawn, Alan Alda and Drew Barrymore; Tim Burton’s black comedy Mars Attacks! with Jack Nicholson and Glenn Close; and Michael Mann’s Heat with Al Pacino, Robert De Niro and Val Kilmer. TM & © 2011 Lucasfilm Ltd. All rights reserved. ™ and © Twentieth Century Fox 2012.
STAR WARS: EPISODE I THE PHANTOM MENACE 3D Lucasfilm directed by George Lucas starring Liam Neeson, Ewan McGregor.
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